The Blog of Daniel

Just my place to write without any delusions of self-importance.

I love science.

On Sunday Morning Alicia and I took advantage of the free day at the Arizona Museum of Natural History.  It's a really cool place and has tons of dinosaur exhibits and artifacts.  This video is of their waterfall event that occurs every 20 minutes.

Later in the afternoon our discussion of it all led to the question as to why if dinosaurs are such a curiosity today, why aren't they mentioned in the bible (or more specifically, in the book of Genesis?)  I thought it was a good question.  I'm assuming they aren't mentioned because they're irrelevant to the subject as are the lack of honorable mentions of aardvarks, armadillos and kittens.  What about cavemen?  I remember watching the 1976 Olympics and I can honestly say that photos of the East German Women's Swim Team are as plausible an explanation as anything.

Oddly enough, Unicorns are mentioned about a half dozen times and anti-christian zealots often use this fact as a way to ridicule believers.  I've always considered this to be about as silly as blaming The Flintstones for promoting homosexuality because when you're with the Flintstones, have a yabba dabba doo time, a dabba doo time, we'll have a gay old time.  Until relatively recently, gay used to mean joyous and unicorn quite specifically referred to the rhinoceros, not magical horses like My Little Pony.

When the big question came, the answer was "No, I do not believe in evolution."  I don't.  Even before I became a Christian, I didn't believe it.  Unfortunately, this often gets me labeled as "anti-science" regardless of how pro-science I am.  What I do know is there is no such thing as settled science because science is never settled.  Settled science is religious dogma, not science.  It's the anathema to science.

Explanations for all things constantly come and go as they're modified, amplified or even dismissed all together as new data comes in.  I tend to think that settled science is only available on a person by person basis because the true believer may be long dead before any new data comes in that unsettles it.  I love God and am fascinated by all things science.  My understanding of science and my faith are not in conflict.  I have rock solid faith that some day God will ultimately provide the final necessary dataset.  I suppose I could say that I look forward to that day when I can personally ask God about all these things, but I have a feeling that questions about evolution will be the least of my curiosities.

The conclusion of that line of our conversation came when a homeless man ran up to us both and asked if we were talking about the bible.  He explained that he loved the bible but he didn't like to call it that because he didn't know where the word bible came from or what it meant.  He preferred to refer to it as The Doctrine.  I didn't get a chance to give him the answer, which is:

Bi·ble
noun
Origin
Middle English: via Old French from ecclesiastical Latin biblia, from Greek biblia ‘books,’ from biblion ‘book,’ originally a diminutive of biblos ‘papyrus, scroll,’ of Semitic origin.

Okay, as I finished writing this I realized the humor of a Flintstones reference in a post about the dinosaur museum.  Ha!  Funny!

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